Abstract: A series of case reports and neuroimaging research points to the underlying neuropathological substrate for obsessive–compulsive disorder (OCD) and the underlying associations between OCD and areas of the frontal lobe. We report a patient wherein the onset of OCD occurred after resection of meningioma of the right frontal lobe and who was treated successfully with paroxetine hydrochloride. We suggest that the onset of secondary (organic) OCD is associated with the frontal lobe, and we propose that the origin of obsessions is located in the right frontal lobe.

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Delirium is a common neuropsychiatric syndrome, especially in patients with preexistent cognitive impairment. Delirium is often precipitated by an acute infection, an operation, or an intensive care unit (ICU) stay and is associated with premorbid conditions, such as cerebral infarction, dementia, and genetic predisposition. The syndrome manifests itself in up to 50% of elderly hospitalized inpatients, with higher frequencies reported for ICU patients.

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Importance The N -methyl- d -aspartic acid receptor hypofunction model of schizophrenia predicts a paradoxical increase in synaptic glutamate release. In vivo measurement of glutamatergic neurotransmission in humans is challenging, but glutamine, the principal metabolite of synaptic glutamate, can be quantified with proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ( 1 H-MRS). Although a few studies have measured glutamate, glutamine, and glutamine to glutamate ratio, it is not clear which of these 1 H-MRS indices of glutamatergic neurotransmission is altered in schizophrenia

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Abstract: Objective: To review the current evidence about psychiatric symptoms in Wilson’s disease (WD).Method: We searched Ovid, PsychInfo, CINHAL and PubMed databases from May 1946 to May 2012 using the key words Wilson(‘s) disease in combination with psychiatry, psychiatric, psychosis, schizophrenia, depression, mania, bipolar, mood, anxiety, personality and behavior.Results: Psychiatric symptoms occur before, concurrent with or after the diagnosis and treatment for WD. Thirty to forty percent of patients have psychiatric manifestations at the time of diagnosis, and 20% had seen a psychiatrist prior to their WD diagnosis.

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