Importance Despite a remarkable co-occurrence of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and schizophrenia, little is known about the clinical and etiological relationship of these 2 disorders. Exploring the degree to which these disorders share etiological factors might provide useful implications for clinicians, researchers, and those with the disorders. Objectives To assess whether patients with OCD experience an enhanced risk of developing schizophrenia and schizophrenia spectrum disorders and to determine whether a family history of OCD constitutes a risk factor for schizophrenia and schizophrenia spectrum disorders.

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Abstract: Objective: Primary care screening programs for mental health disorders are designed to detect patients who might benefit from treatment. As such, the utility of these programs is predicated on the actions that take place in response to a positive screen.

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Director’s Blog Each year at this time, the Kavli Foundation announces its annual scientific prizes. In contrast to the Nobel Prizes, the Kavli Prizes cover three focal areas of science: astrophysics, nanoscience, and neuroscience. Fred Kavli, who died recently, described these prizes as recognizing those who work on “the biggest, the smallest, and the most complex.” This year’s awards in neuroscience, to Brenda Milner, John O’Keefe, and Marcus Raichle, continue the tradition of recognizing those who embrace complexity.

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Abstract: Objective: Monitoring PTSD symptoms after a traumatic injury is beneficial for patients and providers. Text messages can be used to automatically monitor symptoms and impose minimal burden to patients and providers. The present study piloted such a strategy with traumatic injury patients.Method: An automated daily text message was piloted to evaluate PTSD symptoms after discharge from the hospital.

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Just returning from the World Economic Forum (WEF) in Davos, Switzerland. While media reports covered speeches from some of the 40 heads of state attending or skewered the over-the-top parties of the rich and famous associated with this annual meeting, they missed a remarkable story: this was the year that mental health became a hot topic at the WEF.

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Abstract: Objective: Depression is common in cancer patients but frequently undetected. Consensus regarding validity and optimal thresholds of screening measures is lacking.

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My four-year-old grandson has a near photographic memory for outings we took a year ago, for people he met six months ago, and for books he has not seen in weeks.  Soon that will all disappear.  By the time he is eight, he will remember almost nothing of his first four years.  And by the time he is eighteen, he will remember details going back to age four and he will retain language and habits acquired before age four, but in terms of autobiographical or episodic memories, the earliest years will be almost a complete blank.  This normal loss of early memories is called infantile amnesia. Freud, a source not cited often in this space, was one of the first to write about infantile amnesia.  He attributed the loss of early memories to repression, an active forgetting of early experiences because of their heavily charged psychosexual content.  Others have explained infantile amnesia as due to the absence of language, since words seem important for encoding certain kinds of memory.   Still others have cited the need for a sense of self to provide a reference for early memory.

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Abstract: Objective: To review the current evidence about psychiatric symptoms in Wilson’s disease (WD).Method: We searched Ovid, PsychInfo, CINHAL and PubMed databases from May 1946 to May 2012 using the key words Wilson(‘s) disease in combination with psychiatry, psychiatric, psychosis, schizophrenia, depression, mania, bipolar, mood, anxiety, personality and behavior.Results: Psychiatric symptoms occur before, concurrent with or after the diagnosis and treatment for WD. Thirty to forty percent of patients have psychiatric manifestations at the time of diagnosis, and 20% had seen a psychiatrist prior to their WD diagnosis.

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Director’s Blog In previous posts I have described the crisis of medication development for mental disorders. Medications developed over the past five decades have been prescribed widely but have not been sufficient for reducing the morbidity and mortality of mental disorders. Yet there is diminishing activity in research and development for new medications within either the biotech or pharmaceutical industries

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Director’s Blog There has been a lot of hand wringing recently over the lack of innovation in medication development for mental disorders and the reduced investments from the pharmaceutical industry in the development of psychiatric medications. This may be an era of angst for medication development, but simultaneously there has been a quiet flowering of innovative behavioral treatments. From cognitive therapy developed to reduce repeat suicide attempts, 1  to family-based therapy for those with anorexia nervosa, 2 structured behavioral interventions have been shown to be effective in randomized controlled trials

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