Importance Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) appears to increase obesity risk but the pathways by which PTSD leads to weight gain are not known. Identification of the links between PTSD and obesogenic eating behaviors is necessary to clarify this pathway and inform development of obesity prevention strategies in PTSD-affected populations. Objective To determine whether women with PTSD symptoms are more likely to report food addiction, a measure of perceived dependence on food, than women without PTSD symptoms

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Importance Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) occurs in about 8% of pregnant women. Stressful conditions, including PTSD, are inconsistently linked to preterm birth. Psychotropic treatment has been frequently associated with preterm birth.

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Why Patients Choose Psychotherapy or Sertraline: From a Clinical Trial of PTSD Treatment

Stephanie Keller, MA
Doctoral Candidate; Department of Psychological Sciences, Case Western Reserve University, OH

First published in Psychiatry Weekly, October 21, 2013, 8(22).

Introduction

Why do some psychiatric patients prefer a particular treatment modality—or modalities—to another? This question is particularly conspicuous in the context of treating posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), for which several psychotherapy protocols show robust evidence of efficacy and exactly two medications—sertraline and paroxetine—have received FDA approval. Numerous lines of research have looked at whether patient preferences for PTSD treatment are shaped by the type of trauma experienced, ethnicity, sex, psychiatric comorbidity, previous PTSD treatment, and perceptions of how or why a treatment is believed to work.

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Importance Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a pervasive and often debilitating condition that affects many individuals in the general population and military service members. Effective treatments for PTSD are greatly needed for both veterans returning from Iraq and Afghanistan and veterans of other eras.

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Importance Delayed-onset posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) accounts for approximately 25% of PTSD cases. Current models do not adequately explain the delayed increases in PTSD symptoms after trauma exposure. Objective To test the roles of initial psychiatric reactions, mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI), and ongoing stressors on delayed-onset PTSD

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Abstract: Objective: The aim of this study was to assess the contributions of different forms of intimate partner violence (physical violence, sexual violence, psychological abuse, and stalking) on symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and depression.Methods: In all 268 women (18 years and older) consecutively receiving a protection order in the Vhembe district in South Africa were assessed by an external interviewer. Hierarchical regressions tested the unique effects of different types of intimate partner violence on PTSD and depression.Results: In terms of PTSD symptom severity, more than half (51.9%) of the sample reported severe PTSD and 66.4% reported severe depression symptoms.

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Background Mindfulness-based interventions show promise for stress reduction in general medical conditions, and initial evidence suggests that they are accepted in trauma-exposed individuals. Mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT) shows substantial efficacy for prevention of depression relapse, but it has been less studied in anxiety disorders.

Source: Primary Psychiatry