Director’s Blog An understanding of how memory works has been the Holy Grail of psychology for the past century. Over the past fifty years, neuroscientists have joined that quest, searching for how and where the brain forms new memories and retrieves old ones.

Read >

Technology continues to impact the way we interact in all aspects of our lives. Where in the past, temporal and spatial constraints significantly limited our ability to gather information, use services and communicate with others, the explosion of information technology (IT) devices (e.g., desktops, laptops, tablets, smart phones, sensors, servers, wi-fi, broadband) have enabled 24/7 access across countries, continents and hemispheres.

Read >

Director’s Blog Last week a short piece in the British medical journal, The Lancet, described an “identity crisis” in psychiatry. In the U.K., the number of medical students choosing psychiatry has dropped more than 50 percent since 2009 and over the past decade the number of psychiatrists has dropped by 26 percent while the number of physicians overall has increased more than 31 percent. Ninety-five percent of posts for junior physicians across all specialties are generally filled; but psychiatry posts, as of last summer, were running more than one third unfilled.

Read >

Abstract: Many patients with Huntington’s disease (HD) develop psychiatric symptoms such as depression and psychosis. For severe symptoms, electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) can be a valuable treatment.

Read >

Director’s Blog Julius Axelrod was one of NIMH’s greatest scientists and mentors for five decades until his death in 2004 at age 92. In addition to his many discoveries – which led to his 1970 Nobel Prize – Julie, as he was known, was famous for his aphorisms.

Read >

Director’s Blog In a wonderful new paper in Science , Jordi Quoidbach, Dan Gilbert, and Tim Wilson describe the “end of history illusion.” 1 This is not about the Mayan calendar or a Y2K syndrome. These scientists studied 19,000 people across six studies to answer a simple question: why do people so often make decisions that their future selves regret? Their results show that people consistently report that they have changed substantially in the past decade and just as consistently predict that they will not change nearly as much in the next decade

Read >