Abstract: Objective: Misophonia is a potentially debilitating condition characterized by increased sensitivity to specific sounds, which cause subsequent behavioral and emotional responses. The nature, clinical phenomenology and etiology of misophonia remain unclear, and misophonic clinical presentations are not currently accounted for by existing psychiatric or audiological disorders.Method: We present a case of pediatric misophonia in the context of comorbid obsessive–compulsive disorder and Tourette’s syndrome.Results: Given the interrelationships among obsessive–compulsive spectrum disorders and misophonia, these disorders may share underlying pathophysiology, particularly within the dopaminergic and serotonergic neural systems.

Read >

Abstract: Objective: Psychosis is a recognized but often forgotten side effect of many commonly prescribed medications.Method: A case of psychosis in a 27-year-old female related to metronidazole treatment is presented along with review of possible mechanisms.Results: The onset and resolution of psychosis appeared to coincide with metronidazole treatment.Conclusions: Clinicians should be aware of medication-related psychosis.

Read >

Abstract: Objective: To report a case of limbic encephalitis (LE) presenting with psychosis.Method: Case report.Results: A woman with LE initially presented with acute psychotic symptoms. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed hyperintensity in bilateral temporal lobes. Paraneoplastic and autoimmune antibodies were negative, but symptoms resolved after starting methylprednisolone.Conclusion: A greater awareness for and knowledge of LE among all disciplines could help early recognition and management of LE and avoid permanent behavioral deficits.

Read >

Abstract: Objective: Premenstrual onset psychosis is a rare condition of unknown etiology for which no treatment trials have been conducted and whose existence as a definitive diagnosis continues to be debated. The literature includes individual case reports and small case series, leaving psychiatrists to make decisions about prescribing antipsychotic agents on a case-by-case basis.

Read >

Abstract: Objective: The objective was to report a case of experienced psychosis during the treatment with methylphenidate (MPH) in a cocaine-dependent adult treated for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) with comorbid cocaine dependence.Conclusion: ADHD is a frequent comorbidity in substance use disorder (SUD) patients. MPH may be effective in treating ADHD symptoms in SUD patients, thus preventing possible adverse outcomes. Cocaine-induced psychosis may be a risk factor for development of psychosis in the presence of a concurrent treatment with MPH.

Read >

Abstract: Objective: To report a case of limbic encephalitis (LE) presenting with psychosis.Method: Case report.Results: A woman with LE initially presented with acute psychotic symptoms. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed hyperintensity in bilateral temporal lobes.

Read >

Abstract: Objective: The risk of depression in women is greatest at childbearing age. We sought to examine and explain national trends in antidepressant use in pregnant women.Methods: This was a cohort study including pregnant women aged 12–55 who were enrolled in Medicaid during 2000–2007. We examined the proportion of women taking antidepressants during pregnancy by patient characteristics (descriptive), by region (mixed-effects model) and over time (interrupted time series).Results: We identified 1, 106, 757 pregnancies in 47 states; mean age was 23 years, and 60% were nonwhite

Read >

Abstract: Objective: The objective was to examine consistency of adherence across depression treatments and consistency of adherence between depression treatments and treatments for chronic medical illness.Methods: For 25, 456 health plan members beginning psychotherapy for depression between 2003 and 2008, health plan records were used to examine adherence to all episodes of psychotherapy, antidepressant medication, antihypertensive medication and lipid-lowering medication.Results: Within treatments, adherence to psychotherapy in one episode predicted approximately 20% greater likelihood of subsequent psychotherapy adherence [odds ratio (OR)=2.20, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.83–2.64]. Similarly, adherence to antidepressant medication in one episode predicted approximately 20% greater likelihood of subsequent antidepressant adherence (OR=1.99, 95% CI 1.74–2.28). Across treatments, adherence to antidepressant medication predicted approximately 10% greater likelihood of concurrent or subsequent adherence to psychotherapy (OR=1.52, 95% CI 1.42–1.63), a 4% greater likelihood of adherence to antihypertensive medication (OR=1.24, 95% CI 1.14–1.37) and a 3% greater likelihood of adherence to lipid-lowering medication (OR=1.16, 95% CI 1.03–1.32)

Read >