Abstract: Objectives: To test the robustness of the findings of previous studies in a large aggregated sample regarding (a) the impact of a patient’s suicide on therapist’s distress; (b) identify a potential subgroup of therapists needing special postvention; (c) and assess potential differences in overall distress between professional groups and at different levels of care.Methods: A questionnaire, characterizing the therapists, their reactions and the patients, had been sent out to 201 psychiatric hospitals in Germany providing different levels of care. Aggregated data from previous studies have been used.Results: In 39.6% of all cases, therapists suffer from severe distress after a patients’ suicide. The global item “overall distress” can be used as an indicator to identify a subgroup of therapists that might need individualized postvention.

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The number of older patients with psychiatric disorders is rapidly increasing nationwide, yet little is known about the outcomes of care for geriatric patients with psychiatric emergencies . This population is also increasing in diversity, and as a result, emergency room clinicians must expand their awareness of ethnicity and its effect on psychiatric emergencies among older patients. Few studies have examined the utilization patterns of psychiatric emergency service (PES) by older patients, but little is known about the impact of race and ethnicity on PES clinical outcomes.

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